About Shimla Kullu Manali

Shimla

Blessed with some of the most spectacular and beautiful landscapes anywhere, it is a travellers paradise -lofty snow peaks, deep gorges, lush green valleys, fast flowing rivers, enchanting mountain lakes, flower bedecked meadows, beautiful temples and monasteries steeped in time. May it be for relaxing, sightseeing, trekking, mountaineering, fishing, para-gliding, skiing, ice skating and golf, Himachal has it all…Come Explore Himachal with himachaltourist…

A quaint little hill train chugs up into the Shivalik foothills, over dramatic loops and high arched bridges to the hill resort of Shimla (2130 m) – the capital of the mountain state of Himachal.

Shimla was one a string of hill stations that the British established to escape from the scorching heat of the plains. The 12 km, crescentshaped ridge on which it is located was first occupied by the British troops, in the early part of the 19th century, during the Anglo-Gurkha War.

The little village of Shymala, a retreat for British officers, soon grew to become the glamorous summer capital of the British, in India.

Shimla’s salubrious climate, easy accessibility and numerous attractions have made it one of the most popular hill stations in northern India. The splendid views of the show-clad ranges of the Himalayas, fine walks through oak and flowering rhododendron, enchanting resorts within easy reach, golf Naldehra and skiing at Kufri and Narkanda make Shimala an attractive destination throughout the year.

Places to see

The Mall : All visitors to Shimla inevitably walk down the Mall, the main promenade that runs along the top of the ridge-a busy shopping area with old colonial buildings, souvenir shops and restaurants. At the top end of the Mall is Scandal Point, a large open square with a view of the town-a favourite rendezvous for visitors and the local people. Overlooking it is the elegant Christ Church with its fine stained glass windows. The labyrinth of Shimla’s bazaars spill over the edge of the Mall.

Viceregal lodge : Housed in the Gothic splendour of the Viceregal Lodge is the Indian Institute of Advanced Studies, India’s premier academy for higher research.

Himachal State Museum : Very close to the Institute, in a colonial building set in spacious lawns, is the museum. It has collections of Pahariminiatures, stone sculpture, local handicrafts, textiles and embroidery.

Jakhoo Hill : Hill, Shiml’s highest point, is rewarding for there are superb views of the town and its surroundings. At the top is an old Hanuman temple.(2Km).

Annandale : Hill, Shiml’s highest point, is rewarding for there are superb views of the town and its surroundings. At the top is an old Hanuman temple.(2Km).

Glen : A pretty picnic spot beyond Annandale is located in the thickly Wooded Glen , beside a sparkling stream.(4 Km).

Summer Hill : The quiett and lovely suburb of summer Hill has secluded, shady walks and charming views. It was here that Gandhiji stayed on his visits to Shimla, in the elegant Georgian mansion that belonged to Rajkumari Amrit Kaur. Summer Hill is located on the Shimla – Kalka railway line.(5 Km).

Chadwick Falls : Just beyond Summer Hill is the 67 m waterfall, cascading into a deep gorge. The Falls are best seen after the monsoon.(7 Km).

Prospect Hill : A 15 minute climb from Boileauganj, Prospect Hill is another favourite walk and vantage point with breath taking views. There is a little temple to Kamna Devi on the top of the hill.(5 Km ).

Sanjauli : A serene location with delightful walks, Sanjauli is ideal for a tranquil weekend. There are fine vistas and the lights of Shimla and Chail can be seen twinkling at night. On the other side, Mashobra and Naldehra are visible. (3 Km)

Temples : Among the little temples dotted around Shimla is the ancient temple of Bihargaon – a splendid example of traditional Himachal architecture.

Just short of Shimla are the temples of Tara Devi and Sankat Mochanb. (8 Km)

Daranghati Sanctuary : This sanctuary located in the upper area of the Shimla district has an undisturbed forest area with plenty of wildlife-monal, tragopan, koklas and khalij pheaseants and musk deer, ghoral and thar. There is a network of bridle paths in the sanctuary. Visitors are advised to seek assistance from the forest staff posted at Dofda and Sarahan. The area is ideal for those who love to trek.

Around Shimla

Mashobra (2,149 m)
Noted for its apple orchards and thick woods of oak and pine. Mashobra is a sylvan retreat with pretty walks and pIcnic spots. A little track leads down to Sipur a grassy glade with a stream wandering through it. Excursions are possible to Shali Peak – the highest point in the area or to Craignano (3 km) with its elegant guest house set in a delightful flower-filled garden. (9.6 km)

Kufri (2,622 m)
Kufri is a noted summer and winter resort with its glorious views of forested slopes and tall ranges iced in a covering of perpetual snow. A fine ski resort, Kufri has a winter season that extends from January to March. A sparkling winter sports festival is held each year in February. (16 km)

Fagu (2,509 m)
Just 6 km from Kufri, Fagu is a vantage point with panoramic views of the ranges and valleys. Picturesquely located amid forests and orchards, Fagu has a rest house and tourist bungalow overlooking the Giri Valley.

Naldehra
The scenic, nine hole golf course with its springly turf and crown of deodar was laid out at the instance of the Viceroy, Lord Curzon. So enamoured was he by the beauty of the spot, that he named his youngest daughter Alexandra Naldera. (23 km)

Tattapani
Tattapani is just 28 km from Naldehra, along a road winding through the scenic country side. The hot sulphur springs here, are hoted for their invigorating and curative powers. (51 km)

Narkanda (2,708 m)
A hill road with superb views links Narkanda with Shimla Narkanda, located amidst fragrant pine forests is a ski resort in winter. It has a choice of slopes ranging from a beginners run and a slalom slope, to sharper descents for the experienced skier. (64 km)

Hattu Peak (3,300 m)
Rising above forests of spruce, the Hattu Peak is a vantage point with spectacular views. (8 km). The pretty orchard country of Thanedar and Kotgarh – beautiful in spring – are not far away. Khadrala and Beghi with their dense forests and Kumarsain with an interesting wooden palace are also within easy reach of Narkanda.

Hatkati (1,100 m)
In the picturesque valley of the River Pabbar, about 104 km from Shimla, is noted for its historic temple dedicated to Durga. Enroute to Hatkoti is the village of Kotkhai, splendidly located among apple orchards – a village with fine traditional architecture. Jabbal, once the capital of a princely state with its impressive palace is also on the way.

Beyond Hatkoti, 11 km away, is Rohru (1,149 m) on the River Pabbar – an excellent spot for angling, with fishing pools teeming with trout. The trout hatchery at Chirgaon, (15 km) upstream, ensures a well stocked river.

Rampur
Rampur was once the capital of the princely state of Bushair and a major centre on the old trade route into Tibet. The annual Lavi Fair, held in the second week of November, is still an important event for the inhabitants of the region. They gather to buy, sell and barter their produce – homespun blankets, shawls, wool and dry fruits – and to celebrate the event with music and dance.

Rampur, on the banks of the Sutlej is on the N.H. 22 – the old Hindustan-Tibet Road that goes from Shimla into Kinnaur. The scenic village of Sarahan with its fascinating Bhimkali Temple is on this road beyound Rampur. (140 km).

Getting There & Away

Air
Linked by air to Delhi, Chandigarh, Kangra and Kullu. The airport at Jubbarhati is 23 km from Shimla.

Rail
It is linked by a narrow gauge line to Kalka which is connected to Delhi, Calcutta and Amritsar by broad gauge. Kalka-Shimla in 96 km and 6 hours by train but only 4 hours by a quaint rail car.

Road
Shimla is well connected by road to most towns within the state and to all major towns in Punjab and Haryana. It is linked by bus and coach to Delhi and Chandigarh as well. Delhi is 370 km away, Chandigarh 117 km, Kalka 90 km and Ambala 166 km. Within the state, Narakanda is 64 km away, Mandi 156 km, Kullu 240 km, Manali 280 km and Dharmashala 280 km.

Bus Service
HRTC (Himachal Road Transport Corporation) has coaches to all major towns in the area besides Chandigarh and Delhi.

General Information

Altitude : 2,130 m above sea level
Temperature : Between sub zero in winters and 30 C in summer. Through out the year.
Best Season : (Summer/Winter)
Clothing : Light Woollens/Heavy Woollens
STD code : 0177

Kullu Manali

Blessed with some of the most spectacular and beautiful landscapes anywhere, it is a travellers paradise -lofty snow peaks, deep gorges, lush green valleys, fast flowing rivers, enchanting mountain lakes, flower bedecked meadows, beautiful temples and monasteries steeped in time. May it be for relaxing, sightseeing, trekking, mountaineering, fishing, para-gliding, skiing, ice skating and golf, Himachal has it all…Come Explore Himachal with himachaltourist…

The valley of gods, as the Kullu valley has come to be known, is perhaps the most delightful region in the western Himalayas. The ancient Hindus regarded it as the furthest limit of human habitation – Kulantapitha, and its original name finds mention in the epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata as well as Vishnu Purana.

Like a slender delicate-hued fern glistening in the morning dew, the valley spreads out its charm on either side of the upper reaches of the river Beas. Running north to south, the main river valley is only 80 km long and 2 km at its broadest, yet a fairly wide area is open to the visitors to enjoy the spectacle of variegated mountain scenery.

In the spring Kullu is at its most colourful with pink blossoms and white flowers while the higher slopes are aglow with gorgeous rhododendrons. With utumn, clear blue skies return and fields and forests alike show wonderful tints of crimson and ochre. By December, there is no greenery except the majestic pines and cedars in the forests. In winter the hillsides are flanked in white.

Situated on the banks of the Beas, Kullu, the headquarters of the district, serves as a nerve centre of the valley and is the starting place for a number of treks. The deodar-fringed grassy maidan, Dhalpur, is a stage for many colourful fairs.

Places to see in Manali

Kothi
12 km. A quiet but picturesque spot. The Rest House overlooks the narrow valley and commands views of the mountains. Below Kothi, for more than a kilometre the river Beas flows through a deep gorge, almost a subterranean passage, 30 metres or more in depth, and the cliffs which flank both sides of the canyon are a favourite haunt for rock pigeons. The site of the bridge provides an interesting historical episode in the early annals of Kullu.

Solang Valley
13 km. A splendid valley between Manali and Kothi which offers views of the glaciers and snow-capped mountain peaks. The plateau is frequently used for holding camps by the trekking parties. Good skiing slopes of the Mountaineering Institute. Venue of annual winter carnival from February 10-14. Bus service upto Palchan village (10 km) and then by jeep or on foot.

Rahla Falls
2 km from Kothi. Here the river Beas hurtles down from a height of about 50 metres. Charming spot for picnics.

Manali Sanctuary
A bridle path from the Manali log huts goes past the Dhoongri Temple and wanders into the dense deodar, kail, horse chestnut, walnut and maple forest which is a part of this sanctuary. Camping overnight in tents at Lambadug or Galiani Thatch is possible.

Lush green alpine pastures and glaciers lie beyond Galiani Thatch. Musk deer, monal and brown bear are often spotted. For those who venture still further into the glacier zone in summer, there are herds of ibex.

Around Manali

Rohtang Pass
51 km. At an altitude of 4,112 metres on the highway to Keylong, the pass affords a wide-spread panorama of mountain scenery. In place of the pinnacled hills, sheltered valleys and cultivated tracts, the eye meets a range of precipitous cliffs, huge glaciers and piled Moraine, and deep ravines. Almost directly opposite is the well defined Sonepani glacier, slightly to the left are the twin peaks of the Geypang, jagged pyramids of rock, snow streaked and snow crowned.

The Beas river rises near the crest of Rohtang from a block of Mica-Schist. The pass normally opens for traffic after mid-June and officially closes in November. To its left, 200 metres higher, is the little lake of Sarkund (Dashair) visited by a number of people, the general belief being that a bath in these waters effects a cure of all bodily ailments-real or imaginary. 10 km before Rohtang is the barren-landscape of Marhi which hums with activity during summer and autumn months because almost everyone stops here for refreshments.

Keylong
117 km. A fair sized village amidst green fields of barley and buckwheat, Keylong is the headquarters of the Lahaul and Spiti district, surrounded with brown hills and snowy heights. Karding Monastery overlooks Keylong and is 3.5 km across the Chandra river while Shashur Monastery is about 1 km. HPTDC Tourist Bungalow.

Triloknath and Udeypur
These are two important places of pilgrimage in Pattan Valley. At Triloknath is a six armed image in white marble of Avalokiteshvara, Bodhisattava. Visitors will enjoy crossing the Chandra-Bhaga river and the trek of 3 km to reach the destination. The temple of Marikula at Udeypur is highly remarkable for its wood carvings. Udeypur is 166 km from Manali.

Places to see in Kullu

Raghunathji Temple
1 km. In the 17th century, Raja Jagat Singh installed here an idol of Lord Raghunathji, which he brought from Ayodhya. As a mark of his penance he placed the idol on his throne and it became the presidind deity of the valley.

Vaishno Devi
4 km. A small cave enshrine an image of goddess Vaishno.Other temples are dedicated to Lord Shiva, Rama and Krishna.

Jagannathi Temple
3 km. A stiff climb leads one to the shrine from where one gets a panoramic view of Kullu town.

Bijli Mahadev Temple
11 km. The Bijli Mahadev temple one of the most striking temple is set on a spur, and is famous for its 60 ft high staff which periodically attracts lightning that shatters the Shivalinga. Each time this happens, it is pieced together by the temple priest.

The Great Himalayan National Park
Located in the beautiful district of Kullu, the 620 sq. km. area has temperate forests – some of the virgin coniferous forests of the state. Vast areas of alpine pasture and glaciers cap this park. Among the animals found in this part of the western Himalayas are musk deer, ghoral, thar, bharal, sewor, brown bear, leopard and snow leopard. Bird life includes a variety of colourful pheasants – monal, khalij, cheer and tragopan. A trek through the park to Rekte-Sar, the origin of the Sainj River and camping amid alpine pastures is a memorable experience.

Kanawar Sanctuary
This sasnctuary located in the Parvati Valley of the Kullu District is the habitat of the Himalayan thar. This big goat is often seen on high mountainous precipices.

A splendid trek is possible along the Garahan Nalla from Kasol through dense deodar and fir forests. The rest house at Kasol is convernient and the Range Officer, Wildlife, Kasol, can offer information and assistance.

Around Kullu

Kaishdhar
16 km. A delightful spot (2,300 metres) for a quiet holiday where one can commune with nature. Many walks in the neighbourhood. Forest Rest House provides accommodation.

Bajeshwar Mahadev Temple (Bajaura)
15 km. The pyramidical temple (9th century AD) is embellished with wonderful carvings in stone and sculptural decorations. The three large image slabs on the exterior are all of a high order of sculpture in the Indian classical (Shikara) style.

Kasol
42 km. Situated on the banks of Parvati river, Kasol in the Parvati valley makes a good holiday destination. Charmingly located in an open space which slopes down to a broad expanse of clear white sand at the edge of the river. The place is known for trout fishing.

Manikaran
45 km. On the trekking route to Pulga and Pin Parvati pass, Manikaran is famous for its hot springs. Thousands of people take a dip in its hot waters. The water is so hot that dal (pulses), rice etc. can be boiled in it. It is also a well known pilgrimage centre and there is an ancient Hindu temple and a gurdwara here. According to a legend, Manikaran is also associated with Lord Shiva and his divine consort, Parvati, who lost and recovered her ear-ring here.

Larji
34 km. South of Kullu at an elevation of 957 metres, this is a small hamlet providing excellent trout fishing. A Rest House is located in a stunning position, at an angle between the foaming torrents of the rivers Sainj and Tirthan, before they join the Beas a few hundred anglers.

Pulga and Khirganga
16 km. A stiff march takes one to the restful solitude of the Forest Rest House whose immediate environment affords a sylvan and peaceful retreat for body and mind. The Tos nullah, which branches off from the main Paravati valley is well worth exploration by those who favour the wilder aspects of natural scenery and are prepared to camp out. 10 km from Pulga lies Khirganga which is well-known for its hot springs.

Banjar
58 km. an excellent spot (1,534 metres) for trout fishing in Tirthan river. the famous temple of Shringa Rishi is located here in whose honour a fair is held every year in May.
Accommodation is available at a PWD Rest House.

Shoja
13 km from the Banjar PWD Rest House (2,650 metres) on the Kullu side of the Jalori pass, it is located in a setting of marvellous scenic surroundings.

Raison
16 km. On the way to Manali, it is an ideal site at an elevation 1,433 metres for spending a quiet holiday in solitary splendour and for holding youth camps and rallies. On the gurgling banks of the Beas there are 14 wooden huts of HPTDC.

Katrain
20 km. The central and the widest part of the valley on the way to Manali and at a height of 1,463 metres. Apple orchards, a Fruit Research Station and a trout hatchery lend prominence to the place. HPTDC’s Hotel Apple Blossom and Tourist Cottage.

Naggar
28 km. On the left bank of the Beas and about three hundred metres above the river, Naggar is delightfully situated on a wooded slope and commands an extensive view, especially of the north west of the valley. It is an excellent place for a longer stay. Naggar was the capital of the Kullu Rajas for about 1,400 years. There are a large number of famous temples in and around Naggar. Artist Nicholas Roerich’s art gallery is also worth a visit. Cars and jeeps can easily go up to the Naggar Castle which is now Himachal Tourism’s well furnished Hotel Castle.

Malana
28 km. up to Naggar by bus and then 20 km. on foot. A little ahead off the beautiful Chandrakhani pass lies the tiny village of Malana, famous for the temple of Jamlu and its distinct social and cultural life. Reputed to be the oldest democracy in the world in existence where all the inhabitants of the village take part in managing its affairs. An exciting place for trekking.

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